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Thomas Struth

This Place (group show)
The Picker Art Gallery at Colgate University, Hamilton
1 February - 20 May 2018

This Place comprises the work of twelve photographers who, between 2009 and 2012, spent extended periods of time in Israel and the West Bank. Frédéric Brenner, Wendy Ewald, Martin Kollar, Josef Koudelka, Jungjin Lee, Gilles Peress, Fazal Sheikh, Stephen Shore, Rosalind Fox Solomon, Thomas Struth, Jeff Wall, and Nick Waplington each brought their own expertise and perspective to bear in developing their individual projects. Brought together in This Place, their photographs reveal a portrait of a land and its peoples that is complex, fragmented, and paradoxical.

The Picker Art Gallery will present works by four of the twelve photographers: Josef Koudelka, Rosalind Fox Solomon, Thomas Struth, and Nick Waplington. The exhibition is part of a collaborative project with the Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College, the University Art Museum at SUNY Albany, and the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College. Each museum is exhibiting their portion of This Place concurrently. This experimental presentation underlines the intention of the organizers and institutions to offer the exhibition as a space of experimentation, questioning, and dialogue.

The Picker Art Gallery at Colgate University, Hamilton


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Thomas Struth

Bernd, Hilla and the Others: Photography from Düsseldorf (group show)
Huis Marseille, Museum for Photography, Amsterdam
9 March - 3 June 2018

In the spring of 2018 Huis Marseille will be devoted to the so-called Düsseldorfer Photoschule, photographers who studied at the Dusseldorf Art Academy under Bernd and Hilla Becher or their successors Thomas Ruff and Andreas Gursky. The photographic vision of Bernd and Hilla Becher was so influential and successful that these photographers – also known as the Becher-Schüler – have left their stamp on contemporary photography from the mid-1970s onwards. Huis Marseille has a considerable collection of photographs from the Dusseldorf school. These will be presented in the exhibition alongside early, mostly unknown work by photographers such as Höfer, Ruff and Struth, as well as more recent work by young and upcoming photographers.

Huis Marseille, Museum for Photography, Amsterdam


Thomas Struth

Nature Unleashed - The Image of Catastrophe since 1600 (group show)
Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg
29 June - 14 October 2018

In a large-scale exhibition spanning several epochs, the Hamburger Kunsthalle traces based on important works how artists working in different media picture natural catastrophes while also shedding light on humanity’s failure to come to terms with nature due, among other things, of our faith in technology. Nature Unleashed: The Image of Catastrophe since 1600 features approximately 120 exhibits, including paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, photographs, films and videos. As viewers make their way past blazing fires, earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions and sinking ships, they will take note of pictorial constants in the expression of such disasters but will also become aware of the differences in depiction from one era to the next. The show’s special appeal lies in the close juxtaposition of artworks created centuries apart. The trajectory of exhibited works spans an arc from the years around 1600 to the present day. Contemporary works serve to anchor the theme in the here and now and underline its topicality.

Catastrophes are omnipresent. The media constantly reports on natural disasters, acts of war, political upheavals and other crisis scenarios, characterising them all with the common term “catastrophe”. Catastrophes don’t just happen, they are made. It is only in our perception, in our active engagement with such drastic events that they take on distinctive contours and reveal their typical face. Every age makes its own catastrophes and redefines the criteria by which certain events are labelled as such. These fundamental observations form the basis for the exhibition project.

Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg


Ai Weiwei, Rineke Dijkstra, Thomas Struth et al.

Stage of Being (group show)
Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar
9 December 2017 - 13 May 2018

Who are we? Where do we come from? What are we doing here? Where are we going?

We live in a world of progress: we know more and are capable of more, we live longer than ever before; maybe one day we will even achieve immortality. At the same time, we humans struggle with feelings of emptiness, loneliness and fear. Once, religion and ideology provided guidance and assuaged our doubts. Nowadays, we rely on self-help books, doctors, philosophers and coaches – but above all, on ourselves.

Artists in particular dare to face down the fundamental questions of existence. In fact: the very essence of art might be found in diffusing that existential, human fear. Art can hold up a mirror to mankind. This mirror is sometimes quite direct, raw and confrontational. And sometimes indirect, enshrouded in layers of meaning.

Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar


Thomas Struth

Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture (group show)
Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill
18 March - 17 June 2018

Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture is a comprehensive survey that explores the dynamic relationship between architecture, photography, and the viewer. Seen through the lens of historical and architectural photographers from the 1930s to the present, Image Building offers a nuanced perspective on how photographs affect our understanding of the built environment and our social and personal identities. The exhibition features 57 images that explore the social, psychological, and conceptual implications of architecture through the subjective interpretation of those who captured it.

Organized by guest curator Therese Lichtenstein, Ph. D, Image Building brings together works by 19 renowned, under-recognized, and emerging artists ranging from early modern to contemporary architectural photographers. In addition to photographs, Image Building includes ephemera such as magazines and books that illustrate how the meaning of photography shifts when presented in the context of high art or mass culture. 

Organized thematically into Cityscapes, Domestic Spaces, and Public Places, the exhibition examines the relationship between contemporary and historical approaches to photographing buildings in urban, suburban, and rural environments, looking at influences, similarities and differences. By juxtaposing these photographs, Image Building creates a dialogue between the past and present, revealing the ways photography shapes and frames the perception of architecture, and how that perception is transformed over time.

Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill


Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth (solo show)
Aspen Art Museum, Aspen
19 January – 10 June 2018

Thomas Struth, Front Yard, Tel Aviv 2014, 2014 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Front Yard, Tel Aviv 2014, 2014 © Thomas Struth

Acclaimed German artist Thomas Struth’s pivotal series on the Middle East is on view in Gallery 1 in its entirety for the first time. The series of eighteen monumental photographs of Israel and Palestine taken between 2009 and 2014 depicts places and people throughout the region, encompassing street views, sites of technological research, and family portraits. Photographing within the political climates of East Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, the Golan Heights, Ramallah, Al-Khalil/Hebron, Nazareth, and Negev, Struth conveys vivid and emotional narratives of place.

Aspen Art Museum, Aspen


Günther Förg, Thomas Struth et al.

Light Sensitive 2: Photography from the Schaufler Collection (group show)
SCHAUWERK, Sindelfingen
15 April 2018 - 6 January 2020

Thomas Struth, Grosse Tannen Am Eschberg - N°13, Winterthur 1992, 1992 © Thomas Struth
Thomas Struth, Grosse Tannen Am Eschberg - N°13, Winterthur 1992, 1992 © Thomas Struth

Contemporary photography from the Schaufler Collection will be on display from September 2017 at the SCHAUWERK Sindelfingen. The museum will link this show to the LICHTEMPFINDLICH exhibition of 2011, which had presented the large collection of this medium to the public for the first time in the impressive space of the former high rack warehouse in the SCHAUWERK. This lofty storage space inspires with its revolving ramp, which extends over 15 metres upward: an exhibition place par excellence for photography, with spectacular visual axes for viewing from near and afar.

Along with major works from the first exhibition, LICHTEMPFINDLICH 2 will also display photographs that previously haven’t been shown, so that a more comprehensive representation of the contemporary photography collection can occur. The main interest of the collectors Peter Schaufler and Christiane Schaufler-Münch is not directed toward the medium and its history per se, but leans more toward the fascination that arises from certain motifs, pictorial inventions, and their formal transformations.

The classic genres of photography—nude, portrait, landscape, architecture, or industry—are mirrored in the works, but are often citations or stages of conceptual processes. Most of the protagonists within the context of this collection have left behind the conventional framework of photography.

SCHAUWERK, Sindelfingen


Günther Förg, Thomas Struth et al.

Shared Space: A New Era (group show)
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield
1 October 2017 - 22 April 2018

Günther Forg, Häuser und Fenster: Cité radieuse III, Marseille, 1987 Courtesy the Estate of Günther Förg and Bank of America Collection
Günther Forg, Häuser und Fenster: Cité radieuse III, Marseille, 1987 Courtesy the Estate of Günther Förg and Bank of America Collection

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is pleased to present Shared Space: A New Era, an exhibition of photographs and video from 1987 through 2010 that considers the world’s social, economic, and political climate over the past thirty years and how the growing impact of technology during this time, with radically increased and diversified communication, has introduced a new phase of globalization. This exhibition has been curated by Lillian Lambrechts from the Bank of America Collection and is on loan from its Art in our Communities® program.

Shared Space features contemporary artists from twelve countries: the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland. These artists capture myriad spaces for communication and interaction—urban and rural landscapes, homes and backyards, city streets and plazas, and ports and terminals. The exhibition’s point of departure is 1987, a seminal year that marks the signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty by Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, and soon thereafter the fall of the Berlin Wall, events marking the end of the Cold War and the beginning of a new age of international exchange.

Sze Tsung Leong’s cityscapes illustrate the impact of a global economy. Thomas Ruff’s and Günther Förg’s photographs show the rapid transformation of the built environment through images of Modernist architecture constructed upon utopian ideals, now derelict and failing to realize its original intention. Photographs by Raghubir Singh, Thomas Struth, and Massimo Vitali depict masses of people gathering in public spaces from Los Angeles to Vietnam, and the Netherlands—expressing an unprecedented universality of access to information. Despite the interconnectivity of this time, a distancing and disconnect remains between individuals and groups, near and afar, as evidenced in Ben Gest’s Jessica & Samantha (2003), family members in close physical proximity who seem deeply psychologically distanced from one another. Shared Space reminds viewers of their place in the world and their role and impact on current global and interpersonal affairs while also provoking them to consider how they will contribute to “shared space” in the future.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield