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Darren Almond

Visions of Nature (group show)
Kunst Haus Wien Museum Hundertwasser, Vienna
13 September 2017 - 18 February 2018

Darren Almond, Fullmoon @Cerro Chalten, 2013 © Darren Almond, Courtesy White Cube Gallery
Darren Almond, Fullmoon @Cerro Chalten, 2013 © Darren Almond, Courtesy White Cube Gallery

Mankind’s relationship with nature is subject to continual change. But never before in our planet’s history have the changes caused by mankind’s impact on nature had such far-reaching repercussions as they do today. The exhibition has taken twenty-five artistic positions by international and Austrian artists working in the medium of photography and video to examine the way in which our relationship with nature is currently reflected from an artistic point of view. They address the theme of nature and the ways of representing and depicting nature against the backdrop of the Anthropocene, the first epoch in the Earth’s history to be shaped by mankind’s impact.

All the works are situated within the interplay between nature as a place of longing and nature as a resource, and anchored in the juxtaposition between vulnerable eco-system and a force of nature capable of enduring all. They demonstrate that the photographic depiction of nature and landscape as a construct shapes our perception of nature; they also illustrate the ways in which we human beings approach, and distance ourselves from, nature. The spectrum of works on show (ranging from Darren Almond to Anna Reivilä) also serves to highlight just how changeable our relationship with nature actually is. Nature is not a place that stands detached and aloof from cultural contexts; rather, nature and culture are inseparably linked.

Kunst Haus Wien Museum Hundertwasser, Vienna


Additional:

Darren Almond, Charles Gaines et al.

Time as Landscape - Inquiries of Art and Science (group show)
Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, Winter Park
29 September - 31 December 2017

Wonder. It is the experience of awe and inspiration; and also the action of questioning and seeking. Wonder – as experience and action – is cultivated mutually through science and art, and contemporary practices in both fields are more kindred than ever. In fact, their synergies have led in recent years to more overt cross-references and also fruitful and inventive collaborations between artists and scientists. The source of inspiration for this particular exhibition is a selection of artists who desire to understand, question and describe the subject of time: as scientific fact, as relative experience, as aesthetic archive.

The topic is timely as ongoing discussions of STEAM curriculum reverberate in our schools. The preciousness of time is also amplified by growing concerns about the environment and global mortality from a macro perspective to a micro vantage point as individuals struggle to make sense of a faster-paced, connected world where everything runs on the 24-hour news cycle.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum