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Darren Almond, Charles Gaines et al.

Time as Landscape - Inquiries of Art and Science (group show)
Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, Winter Park
29 September - 31 December 2017

Wonder. It is the experience of awe and inspiration; and also the action of questioning and seeking. Wonder – as experience and action – is cultivated mutually through science and art, and contemporary practices in both fields are more kindred than ever. In fact, their synergies have led in recent years to more overt cross-references and also fruitful and inventive collaborations between artists and scientists. The source of inspiration for this particular exhibition is a selection of artists who desire to understand, question and describe the subject of time: as scientific fact, as relative experience, as aesthetic archive.

The topic is timely as ongoing discussions of STEAM curriculum reverberate in our schools. The preciousness of time is also amplified by growing concerns about the environment and global mortality from a macro perspective to a micro vantage point as individuals struggle to make sense of a faster-paced, connected world where everything runs on the 24-hour news cycle.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum


Additional:

Charles Gaines

ARTISTS TALK: A Conversation with L.A. Artists, Njideka Akunyili Crosby and Charles Gaines
The Broad Stage, Los Angeles
21 May 2018, 7:30pm

ARTISTS TALK: A Conversation with L.A. Artists is the second program in a series of talks with influential California-based artists, established to explore the living legacy of Los Angeles' vibrant contemporary art scene. The artists will speak to their work, process, histories and lives, addressing the significance and specificity of L.A. as a creative context for their work. The event joins these tangentially related though distinct voices for the first time in a public forum.

The Broad Stage, Los Angeles


Darren Almond

Art Capital: Art for the Elizabeth line (group show)
Whitechapel Gallery, London
13 March - 6 May 2018

Spectacular new public art commissions by British and international artists will be unveiled across London from December 2018. The Crossrail Art Programme is working with artists to create public art in and around the new central London Elizabeth line stations. This unprecedented project will significantly enrich the presence of contemporary art in the capital’s public realm.

In the first overview of the Crossrail artworks, material such as maquettes, sketches and prototypes are displayed in the gallery’s project and archive spaces. The exhibition reveals the artists’ ideas and the complex process for turning artistic proposals into deliverable public art.

Whitechapel Gallery, London


Darren Almond

Oceans: A Worldview at the Rhythm of the Waves (group show)
Le Fresnoy – Studio national des arts contemporains, Tourcoing
9 February - 22 April 2018

Le Fresnoy and TBA21–Academy are delighted to present the exhibition Océans. Une vision du monde au rythme des vagues. Océans includes artists whose distinctive works cast oceanic perspectives on the cultural, political, and biological dimensions of the planet’s hydrosphere, examining the effects of human-made issues, such as climate change and sea-level rise, while reimagining human and “more-than- human” relationships. The exhibition features newly commissioned works, many flowing from the Academy’s expeditions in the Pacific Ocean, alongside exceptional pieces from the TBA21 collection, and works by artists whose practice is deeply anchored in the oceanic space, among them two former students of Le Fresnoy.

Tidalectics emerges from the TBA21–Academy, a site of cultural production without a fixed locale. Moving aboard the Dardanella research vessel, the Academy is temporarily inhabited by artists, scientists, and other thinkers and practitioners. Since its inception, its program is dedicated to fostering engaged ways of caring for the oceans. If our thoughts and actions as mostly land-dwelling humans fail to grasp these vast bodies of water that cover two thirds of our planet, let alone take care of them, perhaps it is time to consider other, oceanic, ways of being. Océans sets out to do exactly that.

The exhibition cites a neologism by the celebrated Barbadian poet-historian Kamau Braithwaite. His Tidalectics formulates an oceanic worldview, a different way of engaging with the oceans and the world we inhabit. Dissolving purportedly terrestrial modes of thinking and living, it attempts to merge steady land with the rhythmic fluidity of water and the incessant swelling and receding of the tides. It is crafted on “riddims” that are deeply rooted in (post-)colonial anger and hope. Just like navigators who land at a new shore, bringing with them their constantly shifting stories, the concept of Tidalectics can migrate from its original context in Brathwaite’s writing to other geographies and realms: As temperatures increase and the ice at the poles melts faster and streams into the oceans, sea levels will continue to rise all around the world, affecting land across latitudes and spanning apparently disconnected locales.

Océans seeks to comprehend our histories as trajectories tossed by waves, from ocean crossings to systems of exchange, myths, and microbial origins. It highlights processes of cultural adaptation and material change, presenting a rich framework for understanding the coalescing polarities of contemporaneity and history, science and poetics, routes and roots, and ourselves—mostly land-dwelling humans—with the oceans and their many and diverse inhabitants.

Le Fresnoy – Studio national des arts contemporains, Tourcoing


Charles Gaines

Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection (group show)
Nasher Museum of Art, Durham
22 February – 15 July 2018

Charles Gaines, Numbers and Trees, Central Park, Series I, Tree #9, 2016. © Charles Gaines. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York
Charles Gaines, Numbers and Trees, Central Park, Series I, Tree #9, 2016. © Charles Gaines. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

The Nasher Museum presents a major nationwide touring exhibition that offers a new perspective on the critical contribution that artists of African descent have made to the evolution of abstract art from 1940s to the present. Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection is the first large-scale public exhibition to bring together a lineage of visionary black artists. The exhibition begins in the mid-20th century with Abstract Expressionist Norman Lewis and traces a line to some of today’s most celebrated artists, including Theaster Gates and Lorna Simpson, as well as Mark Bradford, who represents the United States at the Venice Biennale 2017.

Solidary & Solitary draws on the Pamela J. Joyner and Alfred J. Giuffrida Collection, which started in 1999 with a focus on abstract work by post-war and contemporary African-American artists, from 1945 to the present. In recent years, the collection’s focus has expanded to include artists from Africa and the global African diaspora.

Nasher Museum of Art, Durham


Charles Gaines

Numbers and Trees IV, #2 Xeno (orange) (site-specific installation)
ICA Miami, Miami
1 December 2017 - 4 November 2018

Charles Gaines, Numbers and Trees IV, #2 Xeno (orange), detail, 2017 © ICA Miami, Charles Gaines
Charles Gaines, Numbers and Trees IV, #2 Xeno (orange), detail, 2017 © ICA Miami, Charles Gaines

Charles Gaines’s multi-panel installation activates ICA Miami’s central stairwell, and explores the artist’s approach to seriality through a unique vertical composition.

The artist’s practice places him within the legacy of Conceptualism, evidenced by works such as his gridded, serial images of trees painted on plexiglass that successively plot the shape of trees on one another. Since the 1970s, he has used self-determined rules in order to translate photographic information; he has said: “I use systems in order to provoke the issues around representation.” Here, photographs of trees are translated in various forms of colorful abstraction.

Gaines’s strict method of presenting his works is notably inspired by early Conceptual practices, but he doesn’t utilize the formal rules or use of language and pictures in the same way that artists such as Joseph Kosuth would. What he intends to lay bare is the arbitrariness and dependence on context of all processes of significance. In simpler terms, in the artist’s view, content, meaning, and emotions do not develop naturally, nor are they universal.

ICA Miami, Miami