Raymond Hains, Richard Prince et al.

On Aime l’Art…!! (group show)
Collection Lambert en Avignon, Avignon
6 July - 5 November 2017

While exhibitions have already revealed some of the major works collected by clothes designer agnès b. for over thirty years, the idea of carrying out her multi-faceted portrait project was never conceived on this scale. Both designer, and director of a film selected at the Venice Mostra, My name is Hmmmm, intimately linked with the world of music, patron of the arts agnès b. has been, above all, a great discoverer of artists since the opening of the agnès b. Galerie du Jour in 1983.

Sharing the same passion for art, the same love of creation and individuals involved with the most sensitive aspects of life, agnès b. and Yvon Lambert connect on so many levels both through their intense involvement with the artists they are involved with, and also because of their eclectic nature and avant-garde vision, making them witnesses of the times they live in.

So, it’s no surprise that 400 works from the agnès b. collection now adorn the spaces of our institution, like so many witnesses drawing a portrait of this woman freed from all convention and a collection focussed on the avant-garde, including works acquired to be shared.

This exhibition takes the form of a journey of the senses and is organised around great artists she has often been the first to collect, and also worldly relationships or unusual aesthetics and strong ideas that seem like happy obsessions.

Just as commitment and politics permeate agnès b’s. own journey through and through, they will make their mark on the entirety of this exceptional presentation. Painting, love, reverie, music, experimental cinema, adolescence, modernity, the avant-garde, the transcending of established borders, whether physical, social or mental, Africa – these are all aesthetic landscapes offered to the visitor to explore through the richness and diversity of the exhibited works, crossed by the need for total commitment to the experience of life and the struggle for freedom.

Collection Lambert en Avignon, Avignon


Richard Prince

Richard Prince - Works from the Astrup Fearnley Collection (solo show)
Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo
2 March - 6 April 2018

Richard Prince, Untitled (Cowboy), 1998. Courtesy of the artist and Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo
Richard Prince, Untitled (Cowboy), 1998. Courtesy of the artist and Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo

In 2018 we mark Astrup Fearnley Museet’s 25th anniversary with a series of smaller exhibitions of important artists from the Astrup Fearnley Collection. Richard Prince - Works from the Astrup Fearnley Collection is the second in our series of anniversary exhibitions.

During the 1970s, the artist Richard Prince turned to the content of lifestyle magazines, cataloguing clichés and stereotypes and transforming them into the iconography of his own work. Rephotographing photographs from these publications, or re-framing photographic elements, he questioned the notion of intellectual property, a radical artistic gesture at the time. As a descendent of Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol, and after Pop art had magnified critical interest in consumerist culture, Prince's "rephotographs" could be seen as a cynical representation of reality, and as a piercing inquiry into the ethos of the American vernacular. His work was not just about copying and the act of appropriation: it was also an existential gesture made by a realist artist, speaking through a figurative language of his relationship to his subject matter. Such works sealed his reputation as a leading manipulator of social and cultural symbols.

Astrup Fearnley Museet, Oslo

Richard Prince

Richard Prince: Untitled (Cowboy) (solo show)
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles
3 December 2017 - 25 March 2018

In two photographic series from the 2010s, publicly exhibited for the first time, Richard Prince (United States, b. 1949) continues his career-long engagement with the motif of the cowboy. Untitled (cowboy), recently acquired by LACMA, and Untitled (original cowboy) achieve the grandeur of 19th-century history painting while also deconstructing the iconography of the American West. Once again challenging the conventional meanings and limits of the photographic medium, Prince reignites debates he sparked some 40 years ago.

In the mid-1970s, Prince was an aspiring painter working in Time Inc.’s tear sheet department, clipping texts for magazine writers. After he removed the articles, he was left with advertisements: glossy pictures of commodities, models, and other objects of desire. Between 1980 and 1992, Prince paid particular attention to the motif of the cowboy, as depicted in a series of advertisements for Marlboro cigarettes. Prince began to re-photograph the advertisements, cropping and enlarging them to make limited-edition prints as artworks of his own. Prince’s re-photography had an explosive effect on the art world, provoking lawsuits and setting auction records. With this controversial practice, he redefined what it means to “take” a photograph.

For his 2015–16 Untitled (cowboy) photographs, Prince revisited copies of TIME from the 1980s and 1990s using contemporary technology. In contrast to this studio-based manipulation, for the 2013 series Untitled (original cowboy) Prince went to Utah, seeking out quintessential viewpoints established by legions of photographers—tourists and artists alike—who preceded him. Extending his interrogation of this particular American protagonist into the era of Instagram, Prince demonstrates that the stakes around originality, appropriation, and truth in advertising are as high as ever.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles

Raymond Hains

Art into Life! Collector Wolfgang Hahn and the 60s (group show)
mumok, Vienna
10 November 2017 - 24 June 2018

In the 1960s, a new avantgarde movement emerged in the Rhineland. It was to break down the parameters of artistic disciplines, with an new internationally networked generation of artists coming from nouveau réalisme, Fluxus, and new music. One of the first collectors of their works was Wolfgang Hahn, chief restorer at the Wallraf Richartz Museum in Cologne. In 1978 his collection of around 400 works came to Vienna, where it is now one of mumok’s key collections. In the exhibition Art into Life! Collector Wolfgang Hahn and the 60s, mumok now presents the major works from the Hahn Collection.
The slogan “art into life” was taken literally in the 1960s. The aim was to overcome an obsolete tradition in painting, using everyday objects, texts, and musical scores instead of creating classical painting and sculpture. All the works shown in this exhibition, beginning with Door by Joseph Beuys and ending with Wolf Vostell‘s action objects, are indebted to this expanded concept of art. Happenings, actions, and performances of new music are well represented, with works by Allan Kaprow, Nam June Paik, and John Cage. Prominent works of Pop art by George Segal, Claes Oldenburg, and Tom Wesselman enter into dialogue with material images from nouveau réalisme, which is a focus of the Hahn Collection, including works by Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely, and Niki de Saint Phalle.

Mumok, Vienna