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Toby Ziegler

The Genesis Speech (solo show)
Freud Museum, London
13 September - 26 November 2017

The Freud Museum London is proud to present Toby Ziegler’s exhibition The Genesis Speech. Taking its title from the final scene of Lindsay Anderson’s 1982 film Britannia Hospital, wherein the protagonist reveals his plans for the future of humanity, the series of sculptural and digital interventions weaves into the fabric of the Freud Museum’s collection.

For several years Ziegler’s work has been characterized by an investigation into the ways that images and objects accumulate and shed narratives, and Freud’s collection of antiquities epitomises this. Freud collected artefacts - statues of Egyptian, Greek and Roman gods, fertility symbols and phalluses – which can be seen as symbols of specific human drives, but also gradually became familiar ornaments, absorbed into their environment; for his patients they may have had completely different associations again, sometimes functioning as triggers in their analysis. The works in this exhibition, though in situ for only a short time, imagine themselves as comparable to this process of absorption.

Freud Museum, London


Additional:

Toby Ziegler

A Certain Kind of Light: Light in Art Over Six Decades (group show)
The Exchange, Penzance
27 May - 23 September 2017

A Certain Kind of Light: Light in Art Over Six Decades is a major exhibition exploring how artists have responded to light, its transience and effect. Encompassing paintings, sculpture, photography, and installation, it features artworks created from the 1960s to the present day by fifteen leading artists.

The exhibition considers the different ways artists have explored the various aspects of light, from its importance as a source of illumination, as a pure sculptural material, as a mysterious force and as a source of energy that can be conceptually converted into other forms.

The Exchange, Penzance


Toby Ziegler

I Want! I Want!: Art & Technology (group show)
Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Birmingham
1 April - 1 October 2017

This exhibition features work by artists made over the last 20 years who have all been influenced by the rapid development of technology. The approach of each of the 26 artists and collectives to their practice is different, resulting in a rich and contrasting view of the world and the culture that surrounds us.

The artists have used computer animation, video, computer graphics, audio, photography, drawing and gaming technology to create films, moving image, sculptures, paintings, interactive games and small and large scale drawings. The artworks themselves tackle a range of themes such as human relationships and behaviour, surveillance and the habits of modern society.

The title is inspired by ‘I Want! I Want!’, an etching created by the artist William Blake over two hundred years ago. It depicts a tiny figure standing before a celestial ladder that leads up to the crescent moon. The image acts as a metaphor for humankind’s ability to dream and turn ideas into reality.

Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Birmingham


Toby Ziegler

Sculpture (solo show)
Stiftung zur Förderung zeitgenössischer Kunst in Weidingen, Weidingen
29 July - 27 August 2017


Toby Ziegler

New sculpture and painting (solo show)
NewArtCentre, Salisbury
23 September - 26 November 2017

Ziegler's sculpture has been described by Penelope Curtis as 'very whole and very empty'. Hence the sculptures made for his exhibition at the New Art Centre (July - September 2014) are made from the thinnest possible aluminium sheets and approximate aspects of the human form - heads, bodies and limbs - and they look almost pneumatic, as if they have been inflated and might possibly float away. Their apparent physical lightness is enhanced by their shiny, multi-faceted surfaces which catch and reflect light from every angle, making them appear barely there. These were counteracted by crushed versions of the 'inflated' sculptures, crumpled by the artist so that their original form has all but gone and which brings them back down to earth. These pairs of sculptures were shown inside and outside, divided by the glass façade of the gallery at Roche Court.

Ziegler has long been captivated by our relationship with objects and his sculpture has referred to a variety of different sources from Parthenon figures and the Pyramids to Rodin and Staffordshire porcelain dogs, which he locates in photographs, prints and book illustrations. His process then involves using computer software to transform the original flat image into a faceted three dimensional object made from a series of polygons. Ziegler reimagines three dimensions out of two and reconstructs something of the original form. In doing so he opens up the boundaries between sculptural and pictorial practice, exploring what is lost in translation in the shift from one to the other, and also what is gained.

NewArtCentre, Salisbury