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Marepe, Beatriz Milhazes, Ernesto Neto et al.

Ways of Seeing Brazil: Itaú Cultural Celebrates 30 Years (group show)
Oca, São Paulo
25 May - 13 August 2017

Beatriz Milhazes, Menino Pescando, 1997. Courtesy of the artist and Itaú Collection
Beatriz Milhazes, Menino Pescando, 1997. Courtesy of the artist and Itaú Collection

How many Brazils would fit in the Oca? After 30 years of great accomplishments, Itaú Cultural is filling this exhibition space with an experience that draws on Brazilian sensibility and creativity.

Paulo Herkenhoff, Thais Rivitti and Leno Veras curatorial design – in collaborative work with the Itaú Cultural team – to show Ways of Seeing Brazil: Itaú Cultural celebrates 30 years. This exhibition of pieces selected from Itaú Unibanco’s art Collection reveals Brazilian art and culture while reflecting the institution’s contribution to this history over the last 30 years.

This exhibition provides wide-ranging and unprecedented access to the collection, focusing on not only artistic languages but also history, politics, identities, and the economy seen from different viewpoints – in other words, Brazilian society’s diverse ways of being.

This exhibition provides wide-ranging and unprecedented access to the collection, focusing on not only artistic languages but also history, politics, identities, and the economy seen from different viewpoints – in other words, Brazilian society’s diverse ways of being.

Itaú Cultural


Additional:

Ernesto Neto

BIENALSUR: International Biennial of Contemporary Art of South America (group show)
Various venues, South America
September - December 2017

BIENALSUR is the International Biennial of Contemporary Art of South America. By means of contemporary art will simultaneously connect over 32 cities in 16 countries and will gather over 350 artists and curators from the five continents.

The BIENALSUR exhibition will take place between September and December 2017. Conceived on the basis of a global network of institutional collaboration that erases distances and borders, and upholds singularity in diversity, BIENALSUR proposes a vast territory built upon the perspective of a "Global South".

BIENALSUR


Ernesto Neto

Enjoy. Art meets Amusement (group show)
Chiostro del Bramante, Rome
23 September 2017 - 25 February 2018

Ernesto Neto, caring time, 2013
Ernesto Neto, caring time, 2013

The art exhibition will highlight the differences in individual perception of the artworks. The audience will have this experience guided by the poetical voice of some of the most important and provocative contemporary artists.

Sometimes breaking the rules doesn’t necessarily mean misbehaving, but expanding rules boundaries. A rule that the Chiostro del Bramante follows in its schedules is proposing “out of the box” exhibitions, in which originality is always the base idea of the project.

Chiostro del Bramante, Rome


Beatriz Milhazes

Roberto Burle Marx: Brazilian Modernist (group show)
Deutsche Bank Kunsthalle, Berlin
7 July - 3 October 2017

Beatriz Milhazes, O Besouro, 2003
Beatriz Milhazes, O Besouro, 2003

From Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro to Biscayne Boulevard in Miami Beach, throughout Brazil and around the world, the innovative and prolific work of Roberto Burle Marx (1909–1994) has made him one of the most prominent landscape architects of the twentieth century. Through more than 100 works, ”Roberto Burle Marx: Brazilian Modernist” will explore the richness and breadth of the artist’s oeuvre – his landscape architecture, painting, sculpture, theatre design, textiles, and jewelry – as well as related works by contemporary artists. The son of a German-Jewish father and a Brazilian mother Burle Marx embraced modernism in the early 1930s, as the movement was taking hold in his country among artists and intellectuals. Using abstraction as his guiding principle, and grand sweeps of voluminous local foliage and colourful flora, Burle Marx devised a new form of landscape expression, revolutionizing garden design. Throughout a more than sixty-year career, Burle Marx designed over 2,000 gardens worldwide and discovered close to fifty plant species, and made paintings and objects of exuberant, rare beauty. Many of Roberto Burle Marx’s most important and innovative projects will be represented by designs, maquettes, drawings, paintings, and photographs. Additionally a focus of the exhibition will be his links to and projects in Berlin. The exhibition has been organized by the Jewish Museum, New York, and was made possible, in part, by Deutsche Bank, The Emanuel and Riane Gruss Charitable Foundation, and other generous supporters.

Deutsche Bank Kunsthalle, Berlin


Marepe

MAC USP in the 21st century: The Era of Artists (group show)
MAC USP, São Paulo
20 May 2017 - ongoing

The current exhibition incorporates this attitude of working together, proposing an almost invisible curatorship while the focus remains on the artists' work. No readings or conceptual movement paths were previously defined. Works are open to free exploration and to the individual experience of visitors, who are free to find their own connections, identity and alterity relations among the array of possible conversations that can be held.

We are talking of a curatorship role that is purposely willing to let all underlying meanings intrinsic to the work of art emerge and play with one another in dynamic and incessant processes. Connections are threads that will never stop moving.

MAC USP, São Paulo


Ernesto Neto

Floating Worlds (group show)
14th Lyon Biennale, various locations, Lyon
20 September 2017 - 7 January 2018

Ernesto Neto, Three Stops for an Animal Architecture under Gravity, 2007
Ernesto Neto, Three Stops for an Animal Architecture under Gravity, 2007

Amid rampant globalisation that is generating constant mobility and a quickening of flows – the “liquidity” of the world and identities, as analysed by the sociologist Zygman Bauman – Emma Lavigne explores the legacy and reach of the concept “modern” in today’s art, in accordance with the definition advanced by the poet Baudelaire, who considered modernity to be “the transient, the fleeting, the contingent; it is one half of art, the other being the eternal and the immovable”. Take the presence of sounds, from David Tudor’s imaginary landscape Rainforest to the murmurs of the world broadcast by the Babel tower of Brazilian artist Cildo Meireles: some artworks remain deliberately open – influenced by the major works of modernity such as Mallarmé’s The Book, Spiritual Instrument – and hint at the thinking of both Luigi Pareyson, who defined an artwork as “the opening-up of an infinity that has been gathered into a form”; and Umberto Eco, who, in The Open Work (1965), analyses the artwork as “a field of events randomly open to some accidental unfolding”. The Biennale will stretch out like a shifting, atmospheric, expanding landscape that is forever reconstructing itself, as reflected in some of the modern masterpieces provided by the Centre Pompidou-National Museum of Modern Art as part of its 40th anniversary, such as the random compositions of forms that will be suspended in the Calder space at the Biennale; and Fontana’s paintings, opening onto endless cosmogonies. The White Cube is cracking up and turning into an organism or a constellation, where – from Hans Arp to Ernesto Neto, from Lygia Pape to Daniel Steegmann Mangrané – art and space biomorph, opening onto projects that challenge the abstraction of European modernity in order to reassess its global reach. The 2017 Contemporary Art Biennale will dock in the heart of a territory whose identity was partly shaped by the ubiquity of water, in a city that “rose from the waters”, and through which the Rhône and Saône run. It will reactivate the imaginative realm conveyed by the Rhône and its tributary, producing an archipelagic topography. Like the white fabric of Hans Haacke’s Wide White Flow or the kites in Shimabuku’s When Sky Was Sea, the Lyon Biennale’s Floating Worlds are being shaken by the wind of libertarian uprisings and contemporary poetic outbursts and aesthetic clashes.

Lyon Biennale


Beatriz Milhazes

Grace Farms Art Project (group show)
The Grace Farms Foundation, New Canaan, beginning 8 October 2016

Celebrate the one year anniversary of Grace Farms with special programming October 8-15, titled “Possibilities Are Endless,” beginning with the public unveiling of Moon Love Dreaming, a permanent piece of site-specific art from renowned Brazilian artist, Beatriz Milhazes. A colorful 108 foot-long wall painting extending the length of the West Barn hallway, Milhazes' piece joins other public art installations at Grace Farms by Thomas Demand, Teresita Fernández, Olafur Eliasson, and Susan Philipsz, all of which are freely available for viewing during public hours.


The Grace Farms Foundation, New Canaan