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Jeff Koons, Albert Oehlen et al.

We love animals (group show)
Kunstmuseum Ravensburg, Ravensburg
1 July - 15 October 2017


Additional:

Albert Oehlen

Albert Oehlen and Peppi Bottrop: Line packers” (dual exhibition)
Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles
1 March - June 2018

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1992/2008. Courtesy of the artist
Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1992/2008. Courtesy of the artist

The Marciano Art Foundation presents Line Packers”, a special exhibition, conceived by Cornelius Tittel, of two German painters Peppi Bottrop (b. 1986, Bottrop) and Albert Oehlen (b. 1954, Krefeld). Beginning March 1, the foundation’s Lounge Gallery will feature Bottrop’s line-drawing paintings responding to the architecture of the Lounge Gallery itself alongside works from Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, a series that the artist began in the early 1990s, which is now regarded as a turning point for contemporary painting.

Bottrop’s work is conceived as a meditation on his hometown, a once prominent coal mining and rail center in the Ruhr region. Bottrop employs charcoal—a metaphor for what once powered the world, and a nod to the now-defunct mechanical industry—in an expansive wall-drawing engraved into slabs of Fermacell, a material now replacing sheetrock or gypsum used in the construction of institutional architecture.

Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, which will be affixed to Bottrop’s walls, made between 1992 and 2008, exemplify Oehlen’s pioneering role as one of the first contemporary painters to explore the nascent capabilities and limits of drawing and line-making through the use of a now-rudimentary Texas Instruments computer. The wall-drawings and supports by Bottrop juxtaposed with Oehlen’s Computer Paintings suggest new possibilities for the line in painting. This line, embedded materially into the Fermacell walls, offers a proposition for the medium of painting to re-define itself. The two autonomous, yet mutually-dependent works establish a place of intensive communication and self-exploration, supporting one another in this single, temporary unification that looks to Wilshire Blvd. and Los Angeles, a city that is just as easily defined by its own lines of interstate and highway infrastructure.

Accompanying this exhibition will be a new text by the arts writer and science fiction novelist, Mark von Schlegell.

Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles


Albert Oehlen

Theft is Vision (group show)
LUMA Westbau, Zurich
18 November 2017 - 4 February 2018

The notion of Theft establishes a site of investigation. This exhibition examines the desire to appropriate – a fundamental theme in the production of art. Throughout art there are typologies that ensue from the appropriation of motifs or of other works of art. As just one form of aggressive theft, the act of citation was already a cultural strategy long before Appropriation Art manifested itself.
At LUMA Westbau the following questions are posed from a contemporary perspective:
What are the genres established through appropriation today? What does stealing mean for artistic production? Is it an act of removal and subtraction? Or can it be a productive strategy as suggested by the art history of Appropriation Art? In the context of this exhibition, Theft is presented as dialogues and translations between artists. In essence, the exhibition confronts two opposing concepts in appropriation: the desire to appropriate as the idolization of sources or as an attack on and subversion of the established.

LUMA Westbau, Zurich


Jeff Koons

Plato in LA: Contemporary Artists' Visions (group show)
The Getty Villa, Los Angeles
18 April – 3 September 2018

Jeff Koons, Play-Doh, 1994–2014 © Jeff Koons.
Jeff Koons, Play-Doh, 1994–2014 © Jeff Koons.

Jeff Koons

Heaven and Earth: Alexander Calder and Jeff Koons (group show)
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
21 October 2017 – 31 March, 2019

Jeff Koons, Three Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Dr. JK Silver Series), 1985. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Gerald S. Elliott Collection, 1995.55.a–k. © Jeff Koons Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago
Jeff Koons, Three Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Dr. JK Silver Series), 1985. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Gerald S. Elliott Collection, 1995.55.a–k. © Jeff Koons Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

For the MCA’s 50th anniversary, we are bringing together two of the most important artists in the museum’s history, as well as icons of the last 100 years. Heaven and Earth: Alexander Calder and Jeff Koons finds common ground between these seemingly disparate artists, with Alexander Calder’s weightless sculptures nominally representing “heaven” and Jeff Koons’s celebrations of the mundane and concrete as “earth.” This pairing highlights both artists’ interest in playing with balance and gravity to make compelling sculptural statements, while reveling in the contrasts between high art aspirations and mundane material choices.

[...]

In the early 1980s, Koons (American, b. 1954) ushered in an influential new era of art with works that borrow from liquor advertisements or posters of basketball legends, as well as over-the-top celebrations of household goods like vacuum cleaners, in order to redefine the boundaries of taste. His star power was recognized early on and the MCA organized his first museum exhibition in 1988, and revisited his work with a major survey in 2008. Thanks to many generous gifts, the MCA collection holds his work in depth.

This playful and unexpected pairing of two of the most recognized artists of the modern era have an extended presence in the MCA’s galleries and will be updated periodically with substitutions by both artists.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago


Albert Oehlen

Cows by the Water (solo show)
Palazzo Grassi, Venice
From 8 April 2018

From Sunday 8 April 2018, Palazzo Grassi presents 'Cows by the water', a personal exhibition dedicated to German artist Albert Oehlen (1954, Krefeld, Germany) and curated by Caroline Bougeois.

The exhibition lays out a path dedicated to Albert Oehlen’s production through a selection of approximately 85 works, including some lesser-known ones, created between the 1980s and today. The works brought together come from the Pinault Collection as well as from other major private collections and international museums.

'Cows by the water' path is not chronological but rather suggests a syncopated rhythm between various genres and periods, thereby underlining the central role played by music in the artist’s practice. Music emerges as a real metaphor of his work method, where contamination and rhythm, improvisation and repetition, density and harmony of sounds become pictorial gestures.

Albert Oehlen (1954, Krefeld, Germany) reveals himself to be a major figure of contemporary painting thanks to his artistic research in constant evolution, dedicated to experiments and to overcoming formal limits rather than to the subject represented.

The artist’s work has already be presented in exhibitions around the world, including at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana in 2017, the Cleveland Museum of Art in 2016, the New Museum in New York in 2015, the Kunstmuseum in Bonn in 2012 and the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris in 2009. 'Cows by the water' in Venice is his largest monographic one to date.

Palazzo Grassi, Venice


Jeff Koons

We are Everywhere (group show)
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Chicago
21 October 2017 - 28 January 2018

Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986  © Jeff Koons Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago
Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986 © Jeff Koons Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

We Are Everywhere, showcases artists who borrow from popular culture—soup cans, movie stills, neon signage, or floor tiles—to critique its workings. Artists such as Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and Bruce Nauman, as well as Chicago Imagists Karl Wirsum and Roger Brown, re-present and reveal social realities that may otherwise go unnoticed. Artists such as Stan Douglas, Cindy Sherman, Gillian Wearing, Jeff Koons, and others have engaged with new forms of media to extend the reach of their own viewpoints and experiences. Barbara Kruger and Lawrence Abu Hamdan further encourage us to think twice about the power structures in which we invest, be they the notion of the state or the corporation.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Chicago