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Joan Mitchell

Mitchell / Riopelle. Nothing in Moderation (group show)
Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec, Québec City
12 October 2017 - 7 January 2018

This exhibition, which was unthinkable in the artists’ lifetimes, assembles nearly 60 works from public and private international collections. It is a major premiere and an outstanding opportunity to celebrate painting’s strength and magnificence.

The summer of 1955 witnessed the memorable encounter between two key figures of abstract painting in the second half of the 20th century: Joan Mitchell (Chicago, 1925 – Paris, 1992) and Jean-Paul Riopelle (Montréal, 1923 – L’Isle-aux-Grues, 2002). Joan Mitchell was a rising star in the abstract expressionist movement in New York. Jean-Paul Riopelle had achieved fame both in Europe and North America as a major practitioner of abstract art. An initially intense and increasingly tumultuous romantic relationship ensued for nearly 25 years (1955-1979). Following the example of several famous artist couples, Mitchell and Riopelle reflect the complexity of such a close emotional bond between two artists with distinct personalities and confirmed temperaments.

Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec, Québec City


Additional:

Joan Mitchell

The Water Lilies. American Abstract Art and the last Monet (group show)
Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris
13 April - 20 August 2018

In 1955, Alfred Barr brought one of Monet’s large panels of Water Lilies (W1992) into the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, at a time when these great "decorations", still in the studio in Giverny, were beginning to attract the attention of collectors and museums.

Monet was presented at that time as "a bridge between the naturalism of early Impressionism and the highly developed school of Abstract Art" in New York, with his Water Lilies seen in the context of Pollock’s paintings, such as Autumn Rhythm (number 30), 1950. The reception of these later Monet works resonated with American Abstract Expression then coming into the museum collections. At the same time, the idea of "Abstract Impressionism" was forged. The exhibition at the Musée de l’Orangerie focuses on this precise moment - when the great decorations of the master of Giverny were rediscovered and the New York School of Abstract Art was recognised - with a selection of some of Monet’s later works and around twenty major paintings by American artists such as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Clyfford Still, Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Philip Guston, Joan Mitchell, Mark Tobey, Sam Francis, Jean-Paul Riopelle and Ellsworth Kelly.

Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris