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Richard Prince

Miroir Miroir (group show)
MUDAC - Musée de Design et d'Art Appliqués Contemporains, Lausanne
31 May - 1 October 2017

The idea that we live in the age of the image has been so thoroughly drilled into us, that all discourse now defines our era in these terms. Paradoxically, it has never been more difficult for each of us to read, analyse and interpret them. The speed with which images are broadcast, especially with new technologies, seems to be inversely proportional to our capacity to understand them in all their complexity.

The one object that has been inextricably linked to the idea of image across all ages and art forms, from art to literature, new media to design, must surely be the mirror. As well as its reflective function, it is has also been imbued with strong symbolic connotations. The mirror is thus associated with an array of myths across many cultures.

The exhibition Mirror Mirror takes the form of a series of chapters and aims to bridge the microscopic gap separating our image from our being. Our reflection is utterly specific, making it undoubtedly the most complex of all images. In it, recognition and illusion are confused, giving rise to an inner disorder linked to our constant desire to read our identity here.

Each chapter tackles a specific theme relating to the mirror or reflections, and presents an array of design objects, complemented by others from the worlds of contemporary art and photography. Artists, whether famous or emerging, offer their take on the idea which, on the frozen surface of the window, now defines our being in the world.

MUDAC - Musée de Design et d'Art Appliqués Contemporains, Lausanne


Additional:

Richard Prince

Utopia Post Utopia (group show)
Aspen Art Museum, Aspen
22 December 2017 - 13 May 2018

Featuring works by Albert Bierstadt, Robert Gober, Richard Prince, and Meg Webster, this exhibition is a re-presentation of Untitled Installation Conceived by Robert Gober, presented at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, in the show Utopia Post Utopia, in 1988. Like the original, the Aspen Art Museum’s iteration includes Bierstadt’s Lake Tahoe, California (1867), Gober’s wooden door and doorframe, a handwritten joke by Prince, and Webster’s Moss Bed (1986–88). Together, these disparate objects offer a space in which the viewer wrestles with reality versus appearance, and nature becomes farther and farther removed from actuality.

Aspen Art Museum, Aspen


Richard Prince

Proof of Life (group show)
Weserburg I Museum für Moderne Kunst, Bremen
20 May 2017 - 25 February 2018

The construction of the Tower of Babel as a massacre. The artist as a dead revolutionary. A stained-glass window made from butterfly wings. Proof of Life brings together 100 paintings, sculptures and photographic works that investigate existential questions in a both palpable and profound manner. Their aesthetic impact inevitably draws the viewer into its spell. What these works bring to view is linked to a tradition of influential pictures, some of which go far back in time. The presented works simultaneously quote, seduce, irritate, provoke and thematize concepts of moral values. This includes a summons not only to situate in historical terms what is being seen, but also to relate it quite concretely to the present. The works come from a private collection that has never before been publicly presented in this form.

Proof of Life raises the question as to whether and why such images anchored in our memory are still relevant today. The exhibition shows how striking pictorial models are updated in a surprising manner and transformed into new visual inventions. The artistic results are simultaneously fascinating and shocking; the aesthetic experiences they make possible are complex and revelatory. They become documents and symbols of our present era and thus vital signs of contemporary culture.
“The exhibition derives its strength from the impact of the pictures, which in no way excludes deeper insights but instead fosters them. The works don’t immobilize us in wordless veneration but cause astonishment, questioning and doubt which we relate directly to the present. Fundamental questions raised by this exhibition are how art possesses this capability and why certain age-old motifs don’t become petrified manifestations in a museum but instead remain extremely lively.” Peter Friese, Director of the Weserburg

Weserburg I Museum für Moderne Kunst, Bremen