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Bridget Riley

Lines of Thought: Drawing from Michelangelo to now (group show)
Ulster Museum, Belfast
10 March - 7 May 2017

Lines of thought explores drawing as one of the most effective mediums for expressing and representing an artist’s ideas. Its immediacy allows artists to act almost at the speed of thought, their choices legible in every line.

The British Museum’s Prints and Drawings collection is one of the world’s greatest graphic collections with around 50,000 drawings and over two million prints dating from the early fifteenth century to today. The exhibition showcases selected drawings from fifteenth and sixteenth century masters such as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo right up to artists working now. Lines of thought thus emphasises the continuing vitality and fundamental nature of drawing, and its importance for artists from Michelangelo to Mondrian, Rembrandt to Rachel Whiteread, Piranesi to Picasso. What unites all of these artists, from the Renaissance through to contemporary practitioners and all those in-between, is the use of drawing as a means of thinking on paper.

Ulster Museum, Belfast


Additional:

Bridget Riley

Seurat to Riley: The Art of Perception (group show)
Compton Verney Art Gallery and Park, Warwickshire
8 July – 30 September 2017

Compton Verney’s summer exhibition will take you on a fascinating and stimulating journey that looks at the ways in which our visual perceptions have been explored by artists.
From the Impressionists onwards, artists have been inspired by historical and contemporary colour theories -most markedly seen in the pointillist work of Georges Seurat and his associates, where colours other than those actually painted on the canvas are generated in the eye of the beholder.
During the 20th century, the scientific and philosophical interest in perception extended into ways of communicating movement via static art forms. Artists such as Helen Saunders, M.C. Escher, Josef Albers and Victor Vasarely variously used tessellation – patterns created by using identical shapes – mathematics, and often colour, to convey the sensation of movement.

The ‘Op Art’ movement from the 1950’s to the 1970’s made stars of Bridget Riley, Carlos Cruz Diez, Jesus Rafael Soto and Julio Le Parc, Peter Sedgley, whose work will be on show in Compton Verney, as will that of their successors, Christiane Baumgartner, Liliane Lijn, Rodney Graham, Daniel Buren, Sara Moorhouse, Luthar Götz, Liz West and Jim Lambie.

Compton Verney Art Gallery and Park, Warwickshire


Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley | Paintings, 1963-2015 (solo show)
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, 15 April 2016 - 16 April 2017

Bridget Riley, Burn, 1964 © Bridget Riley 2015. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London.
Bridget Riley, Burn, 1964 © Bridget Riley 2015. All rights reserved, courtesy Karsten Schubert, London.

This focused display brings together a group of major paintings by Bridget Riley (b.1931) spanning over fifty years of the artist’s career to explore the dialogue between monochrome and colour in Riley's practice. Throughout her career, Riley has created paintings that not only engage the eye, but which elicit physical sensations of flux, rhythm and energy. From the early to mid-1960s Riley worked exclusively in black and white, gaining critical attention internationally for her ‘Op Art’ paintings. In around 1967, Riley shifted her palette to grey and then to colour. For the succeeding decades, Riley has employed a rich array of pigments as she has continued her investigations into perception and sensation through several series of influential bodies of work. Over the past two years, monochromatic paintings have returned into her practice. However, rather than reviving ideas from the 1960s, these paintings function in a new way, progressing directly out of the artist’s preceding paintings in colour. Drawn primarily from a private collection, the display features several paintings that have rarely been exhibited. These works will provide a unique context for Riley’s painting Over, 1966, which has been held in the collection of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art since 1979.


Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh