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Albert Oehlen

Franz West - ARTISTCLUB (group show)
21er Haus, Belvedere Museum Vienna, Vienna
14 December 2016 - 23 April 2017

The 21er Haus attempts to revive West’s concept of the ARTISTCLUB. Starting in mid-January, this idea will be newly interpreted every second Wednesday between 6:00 and 9:00 PM. Heimo Zobernig’s central four-meter-large artwork will, in this sense, specifically serve as an “open stage” for lectures, talks, concerts, performances, and much more. Moreover, any visitor to the 21er Haus exhibition is invited to interact with the objects, which includes the opportunity to sit on any seating areas.

Through co-authorship and collaboration as well as through the re-launching of works from various creative phases and involvement by other artists, West introduced a subversive and often humorous form of play with the way authorship is attributed to artworks. With this in mind, it is important to note another significant work by West, named Extroversion, that was conceived for the 2011 Biennale di Venezia. In this work, West practically turned the walls of his studio kitchen inside out. Made by friends, colleagues, and co-workers, it involves 43 different artistic works that similarly upend themselves. While retaining their autonomy, they also come together to form a larger, more complex work of art. In addition to the typical conceptual displacement between work and the author, Extroversion also introduces a new and exciting aspect of West’s experience and treatment of space and architecture. The work itself, therefore, forms the starting point for an additional focus of the exhibition, one that concretely explores his approach toward space and architecture.

Belvedere Museum Vienna


Additional:

Jeff Koons, Albert Oehlen et al.

We love animals (group show)
Kunstmuseum Ravensburg, Ravensburg
1 July - 15 October 2017


Albert Oehlen

Albert Oehlen: Ö (solo show)
Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana
7 July - 10 September 2017

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2017. Courtesy the artist
Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2017. Courtesy the artist

Albert Oehlen, Thomas Struth et al.

Oracle (group show)
The Broad, Los Angeles
29 April 2017 - 3 September 2017

Albert Oehlen, FN23, 1990 © Albert Oehlen. Courtesy of The Broad
Albert Oehlen, FN23, 1990 © Albert Oehlen. Courtesy of The Broad

In an increasingly small world that spans politics, culture and commerce, The Broad will present an interpretation of the elusive globalizing forces at work in contemporary society in Oracle, a free collection installation this spring that will fill the museum’s first-floor galleries with more than 30 works from the Broad collection. Opening April 29, 2017, the four-month installation will feature works by over 20 artists including El Anatsui, Mark Bradford, Peter Halley, William Kentridge, Julie Mehretu, Shirin Neshat, Albert Oehlen, Jeff Wall and Terry Winters, plus recent acquisitions by Ericka Beckman, Sterling Ruby, Oscar Murillo, Tauba Auerbach and Andreas Gursky. Four artworks in the installation will make their debut in Los Angeles, including one work completed by the artist this year.

From everyday experiences to protest movements as monumental as the Arab Spring uprisings across the Middle East, to themes that probe systems of social control or examine global commerce, artworks in Oracle tackle the effects of organizational frameworks on global events and private individuals. Some works in the installation symbolize marketplace machinations, both official and unofficial, while others are meditations on games, surveillance, vast data sets, mathematical and biological patterns, and even the logic of art itself. Just under the surface of the works in Oracle is an air of anxiety, as if individuals’ freedoms within these manmade phenomena are illusory or beyond reach.

 “‘Globalization’ is a term now in the forefront in politics and the media, but for decades, contemporary artists have represented it in their work, responding to and decoding its many forms. Oracle looks at how artists have anticipated the forces that have real consequences in our daily lives yet can be obscured from direct view.” - Joanne Heyler, founding director of The Broad

The Broad, Los Angeles


André Butzer, Günther Förg, Frank Nitsche, Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool et al.

Abstract Painting Now! (group show)
Kunsthalle Krems, Krems
2 July - 5 November 2017

André Butzer, Untitled, 2014. Photo: Johannes Plattner Courtesy the artist and Galerie Bernd Kugler, Innsbruck
André Butzer, Untitled, 2014. Photo: Johannes Plattner Courtesy the artist and Galerie Bernd Kugler, Innsbruck

Featuring some sixty different art positions, the exhibition Abstract Painting Now! will place the focus on the present-day international situation of the nonrepresentational easel painting, covering the full range of a still significant painterly practice. The historical basis of the show is the development that followed upon Abstract Expressionism, carried above all by Gerhard Richter and Sigmar Polke. While the former after a period of agony, in which his grey “Inpaintings” were created, turned to the beautiful and seemingly expressive, the latter used abstraction as an ironic paraphrase, thus commenting on the veracity of the brush stroke as a mark of the artist self.

Kunsthalle Krems


Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool et al.

Progressive Praxis (group show)
de la Cruz Collection, Miami
29 November 2016 - November 2017

Progressive Praxis considers the impact of preceding art movements and the way contemporary artists conceptually engage with the advancements of technology. Our society is conditioned to create, disseminate, and alter information as it sees fit. The use of computers as a method of executing work is no longer a game changer for artists, as there are no traditional boundaries between the virtual and physical. Artists today embrace technology to overcome the limitations of physicality and past formal art processes. The artists selected for this year’s exhibition, reveal a generational position that is inherent to an artistic idea and the language of their time.

The architecture of the galleries was taken into consideration in framing this exhibition.

de la Cruz Collection Miami