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Christopher Wool

The World is Made of Stories: Works from the Astrup Fearnley Collection (group show)
Astrup Fearnley Museum, Oslo
4 December 2015 - 30 May 2017

Nobody can see, perceive or apprehend the whole world on their own. We all learn about the world through others, through different kinds of stories told by the media or by individuals. The exhibition ‘The World is Made of Stories’ is a constellation of narrative works that tell private and public stories. Together, they make up a multi-layered narrative referring to different times and geographical places. It is a story about art history, urbanism, politics, memory, sexuality and violence, religion and aesthetics, to name just a few of the themes that the artists have addressed in their works using a variety of materials, techniques and narrative structures. ‘The World is Made of Stories’ offers a polyphony of voices, objects and images, which enlighten while also raising important questions.

Astrup Fearnley Museum Oslo


Additional:

Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool

Progressive Praxis (group show)
de la Cruz Collection, Miami
29 November 2016 - November 2017

Progressive Praxis considers the impact of preceding art movements and the way contemporary artists conceptually engage with the advancements of technology. Our society is conditioned to create, disseminate, and alter information as it sees fit. The use of computers as a method of executing work is no longer a game changer for artists, as there are no traditional boundaries between the virtual and physical. Artists today embrace technology to overcome the limitations of physicality and past formal art processes. The artists selected for this year’s exhibition, reveal a generational position that is inherent to an artistic idea and the language of their time.

The architecture of the galleries was taken into consideration in framing this exhibition.

de la Cruz Collection Miami


Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool

Hartung and the lyrical painters, 11 December 2016 - 17 April 2017
Fonds Hélène & Édouard Leclerc, Landerneau

In partnership with the Fonds Hélène et Édouard Leclerc pour la Culture of Landerneau (Finistère, France), the Hartung-Bergman Foundation is organizing the exhibition “Hartung and the Lyrical Painters”, curated by Xavier Douroux, director of the art center Le Consortium (Dijon, France), which will run from December 11 to April 17, 2017.

The 60 artworks spanning a period from the 30’s to the 80’s, and including 20 paintings never shown before, were lent by the Foundation in order to create an exhibition that would not solely be dedicated to Hand Hartung, but rather, aims at giving an esthetic, historical, as well as critical overview of what is called “lyricism” by displaying Hartung’s works along with the works of seventeen other artists.
Hartung has long been associated with this term dating from the post-war period. It characterizes a spontaneous and gestural abstraction in which the free expression of a subject, unleashed from its boundaries, dominates. Through this exhibition, an in-depth analysis of Hartung’s “lyricism”, which paradoxically mixes freedom of gesture and controlled construction, will be displayed. To this end, Xavier Douroux has conceived a scenography that intertwines the works of the French-German painter with those of the artists traditionally considered as members of post-war “lyricism”, starting with Jean Degottex, Georges Mathieu and Gérard Schneider, and including those of contemporary artists such as Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool and Shirley Jaffe, who recently passed away.

One conclusion comes to mind from this historical mapping offered to the public: “Lyricism” goes well beyond Paris in the years 1945-1960. It is also the predominant idea arising from the dialogue between Hans Hartung and those artists, whether they came from the German, French, American, or culture-bridging scenes like Cy Twombly, the American artist shaped by Antic references, who produced a major part of his work in Italy.
The artists displayed alongside Hans Hartung are: Joe Bradley, Jean Degottex, Willem De Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Simon Hantaï, Shirley Jaffe, Georges Mathieu, Albert Oehlen, Sigmar Polke, Gérard Schneider, Gérard Traquandi, Cy Twombly, Charline Von Heyl, Fritz Winter, Christopher Wool, and Yves Zurstrassen.

Fondation Hartung Bergman, Antibes