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Bridget Riley

Seurat to Riley: The Art of Perception (group show)
Compton Verney Art Gallery and Park, Warwickshire
8 July – 1 October 2017

Bridget Riley, Achaean, 1981 ©Tate, London 2017 ©Bridget Riley 2017.  All rights reserved.
Bridget Riley, Achaean, 1981 ©Tate, London 2017 ©Bridget Riley 2017. All rights reserved.

Compton Verney’s summer exhibition will take you on a fascinating and stimulating journey that looks at the ways in which our visual perceptions have been explored by artists.
From the Impressionists onwards, artists have been inspired by historical and contemporary colour theories -most markedly seen in the pointillist work of Georges Seurat and his associates, where colours other than those actually painted on the canvas are generated in the eye of the beholder.
During the 20th century, the scientific and philosophical interest in perception extended into ways of communicating movement via static art forms. Artists such as Helen Saunders, M.C. Escher, Josef Albers and Victor Vasarely variously used tessellation – patterns created by using identical shapes – mathematics, and often colour, to convey the sensation of movement.

The ‘Op Art’ movement from the 1950’s to the 1970’s made stars of Bridget Riley, Carlos Cruz Diez, Jesus Rafael Soto and Julio Le Parc, Peter Sedgley, whose work will be on show in Compton Verney, as will that of their successors, Christiane Baumgartner, Liliane Lijn, Rodney Graham, Daniel Buren, Sara Moorhouse, Luthar Götz, Liz West and Jim Lambie.

Compton Verney Art Gallery and Park, Warwickshire


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Bridget Riley

Kaleidoscope: Colour and Sequence in 1960s British Art (group show)
Nottingham Lakeside Arts, Nottingham
15 July - 24 September 2017

British art of the 1960s is noted for its bold, artificial colour, alluring surfaces and capricious shapes and forms, yet these exuberant qualities are often underpinned by a strong sense of order, founded on repetition, sequence and symmetry.

Bringing together outstanding examples of painting and sculpture from the Arts Council Collection and other major UK collections, Kaleidoscope examines 1960s visual art through a fresh and surprising lens, bringing into view the relationship between colour and form, rationality and irrationality, order and waywardness.

Kaleidoscope is the first Arts Council Collection survey of 1960s British art in over twenty years, and as such it assumes a wide perspective, ranging across media to find fresh correspondences and a common language between diverse artistic movements. It encompasses the mind-bending surfaces of Op Art, the flattened repetition of Pop, the mathematical order of Constructivism, and the sequential placement of brightly-coloured abstract units found in New Generation sculpture.

Kaleidoscope presents the work of over twenty artists including: Tess Jaray, Phillip King, Kim Lim, Mary Martin, Eduardo Paolozzi, Bridget Riley, Tim Scott, Richard Smith, William Tucker and William Turnbull. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated publication featuring a new essay by co-curator Sam Cornish.

Nottingham Lakeside Arts, Nottingham


Bridget Riley

Going Public - The Kirkland Collection (group show)
Graves Gallery, Museum Sheffield, Sheffield
2 September - 2 December 2017

Bridget Riley, Red Overture, 2012  © Bridget Riley 2017. All rights reserved
Bridget Riley, Red Overture, 2012 © Bridget Riley 2017. All rights reserved

Reflecting a passion for photography, minimalism and geometric abstraction, Jack Kirkland’s personal collection brings together work by some of the most important artists of the past 75 years.

This new exhibition showcases personally selected highlights from the collection, including painting, sculpture, works on paper and photography by Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Josef and Anni Albers, Bridget Riley, Lewis Baltz and more.

Museum Sheffield


Bridget Riley

Konkrete Anliegen. Sammlung Teufel (group show)
Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, Stuttgart
4 February 2017 - 7 January 2018


Bridget Riley

Serial Formations. 1967/2017. Re-Staging of the first German exhibition of international tendencies in Minimalism (group show)
Daimler Art Collection, Stuttgart
3 June - 5 November 2017

The exhibition ‘Serielle Formationen’ (‘Serial Formations’), jointly curated by Peter Roehr and Paul Maenz for the Frankfurter Universität’s studio gallery in 1967, can be seen as the first thematic exhibition on Minimalist trends in Germany. In the context of its exhibition series ‘Minimalism in Germany’, which started in 2005, the Daimler Art Collection is making a first attempt to re-stage the historical presentation.

Serielle Formationen’ was an outstanding exhibition that brought together the contemporary trends of the period. In particular, it showed artwork by artists from Germany and elsewhere side by side. A total of 62 artworks by 48 artists were selected because they were pictures and objects with ‘serial order’ as a visual feature—although the concepts behind them were highly diverse and sometimes downright contradictory. The European Zero movement was represented, alongside manifestations of Nouveau Réalisme, Pop Art and Op Art and American Minimal and Conceptual Art. The exhibition was accompanied by an ambitious catalogue containing six original graphical works and extensive artwork documentation and artist statements. “The ambition of ‘Serielle Formationen’ was to inform and to identify the differences between seemingly similar art phenomena.” (Maenz)

Daimler Art Collection, Stuttgart


Bridget Riley

Into the Light: Photography and Abstract Art (group show)
Tate Modern, London
3 May - 16 September 2018

How photographers responded and contributed to the invention of abstract art

The birth of abstract art and the invention of photography were both defining moments in modern visual culture, but these two stories are often told separately. Into the Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction. Key vintage prints are brought together from pioneers like Paul Strand, László Moholy-Nagy and Man Ray, as well as lesser-known experimental works and those of contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff. Their work is shown alongside abstract paintings, sculptures and installations by major figures in abstract art, from Georges Braque and Jackson Pollock to Carl Andre and Bridget Riley.

Tate Modern, London


Bridget Riley

Cosmos (solo show)
Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, Christchurch
8 June - 12 November 2017

Bridget Riley, Cosmos, 2016-2017. Courtesy of the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu © Bridget Riley 2017. All rights reserved
Bridget Riley, Cosmos, 2016-2017. Courtesy of the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu © Bridget Riley 2017. All rights reserved

Bridget Riley’s paintings require our active participation – there’s no chance of uninvolved viewing either from a distance or closer up. Cosmos is Christchurch Art Gallery’s new wall painting, and the fourth of five major works acquired to mark our extended time of closure following the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010–11. It is accompanied by an exhibition that summarises some sixty years of committed practice by this internationally-acclaimed English artist, from a 1959 copy of Georges Seurat’s Le Pont de Courbevoie to her newest painting made for Christchurch. Highly individual and richly imbued with lessons from her respected forebears, we reveal a lifetime of continuous experimentation within self-imposed limits.

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, Christchurch


Bridget Riley

To Distribute and Multiply: The Feibes & Schmitt Gift (group show)
The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls
From 10 June 2017

The Hyde Collection celebrates the opening of its first gallery dedicated to Modern and Contemporary art, the Feibes & Schmitt Gallery, with forty works drawn from the collection donated by Werner Feibes and the late James Schmitt in 2016. Architects by profession, the collectors primarily acquired Abstract and non-representational art, reveling in their contemporaries’ new-found freedom from depicting the natural world. The title of the exhibition, To Distribute and Multiply, is inspired by the words of artist and teacher Josef Albers, whose work is represented in the collection. In addition to Albers, the exhibition features a number of works by other major twentieth-century artists including Jean (Hans) Arp, Ellsworth Kelly, Sol LeWitt, Louise Nevelson, George Rickey, Bridget Riley, and Andy Warhol.

The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls


Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley (solo show)
The Chinati Foundation, Marfa
6 October 2017 - 2019

Bridget Riley, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, 1983, as wall painting, Bolt of Colour, 2017. Courtesy Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas. ©Bridget Riley. All rights reserved. Photo: Alex Marks
Bridget Riley, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, 1983, as wall painting, Bolt of Colour, 2017. Courtesy Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas. ©Bridget Riley. All rights reserved. Photo: Alex Marks

In October 2017 the Chinati Foundation will inaugurate a large new multicolored wall painting by Bridget Riley. The artwork has been conceived specifically for the museum’s special exhibition building and will encompass the entire U-shaped enclosure. The work will debut during Chinati Weekend, October 6 through 8, and remain on view through 2019.

For more than fifty years Bridget Riley has pursued a rigorous, open-ended, and self-renewing inquiry into the constituent elements of abstract painting. She established her reputation in the early and mid-1960s with visually dizzying black-and-white works and then, through a slow step-by-step process later that decade, began to explore the properties of color. Throughout her career, Riley has developed paintings through the accumulation and distribution of particular forms—vertical and horizontal stripes, circles, triangles, and rhomboids, curving bands—that move rhythmically across the surface of a painting. The works create luminous visual fields that are difficult to take in all at once and that seem to shimmer, blink, and glow in an indeterminate space between the viewer and the actual surface of the painting. Over the course of her career, Riley’s explorations of the possibilities of a given template of shapes and colors have prompted further investigations, and she often returns to forms she has used earlier in order to test them in new contexts.

Riley’s first wall painting was made in response to a 1979 invitation from the Royal Liverpool Hospital to conceive a work for its walls. Riley devised a visual scheme featuring horizontal ribbons of color, running the lengths of the hospital corridors. The palette, like that of her paintings at the time, was inspired by a 1980 trip to the pyramids and tomb paintings of ancient Egypt. Of this color scheme Riley later wrote: “The Ancient Egyptians had a fixed palette. They used the same colors—turquoise, blue, red, yellow, green, black and white—for over 3,000 years….In each and every usage these colors appeared different but at the same time they united the appearance of the entire culture. Perhaps even more important, the precise shades of these colors had evolved under a brilliant North African light and consequently they seemed to embody the light and even reflect it back from the walls.”

Riley completed the design for the Royal Liverpool Hospital in 1983. In the years since, she has made many more wall paintings, including a work for two floors of St. Mary’s Hospital in London in 1987, with a third floor completed in 2014. In addition to these commissions, Riley has made wall drawings for numerous museum and gallery exhibitions and collections in the U.S., the U.K., and Europe.

Riley’s wall painting for Chinati will be the artist’s largest work to date and span six of the eight walls of the building. As referenced in the work’s title, Wall Painting, Royal Liverpool Hospital 1983–2017, the mural revisits Riley’s Egyptian palette and establishes a continuity between the design for the Royal Liverpool Hospital and the new work for Chinati. It is inspired in part by similarities in size and spatial orientation in the sites of each project and affinities between the brilliant light and palette the artist witnessed in Egypt and the high desert landscape in which the Chinati Foundation is situated.

Riley draws inspiration from nature—not as a subject to be depicted but as a play of perceptions and sensations. She has written: “For me nature is not landscape, but the dynamism of visual forces—an event rather than an appearance. These forces can only be tackled by treating color and form as ultimate identities, freeing them from all descriptive or functional roles.” Riley’s paintings make plain how they were made yet induce optical effects that supersede their physical qualities, demonstrating a rapport with works in Chinati’s permanent collection by artists of her generation such as Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, and Robert Irwin. Her wall painting for Chinati will merge art and architecture and release the potentiality of color in harmony with many of the works in the museum’s collection.

The Chinati Foundation, Marfa