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Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool et al.

Hartung and the lyrical painters
Fonds Hélène & Édouard Leclerc, Landerneau
11 December 2016 - 17 April 2017

In partnership with the Fonds Hélène et Édouard Leclerc pour la Culture of Landerneau (Finistère, France), the Hartung-Bergman Foundation is organizing the exhibition “Hartung and the Lyrical Painters”, curated by Xavier Douroux, director of the art center Le Consortium (Dijon, France), which will run from December 11 to April 17, 2017.

The 60 artworks spanning a period from the 30’s to the 80’s, and including 20 paintings never shown before, were lent by the Foundation in order to create an exhibition that would not solely be dedicated to Hand Hartung, but rather, aims at giving an esthetic, historical, as well as critical overview of what is called “lyricism” by displaying Hartung’s works along with the works of seventeen other artists.
Hartung has long been associated with this term dating from the post-war period. It characterizes a spontaneous and gestural abstraction in which the free expression of a subject, unleashed from its boundaries, dominates. Through this exhibition, an in-depth analysis of Hartung’s “lyricism”, which paradoxically mixes freedom of gesture and controlled construction, will be displayed. To this end, Xavier Douroux has conceived a scenography that intertwines the works of the French-German painter with those of the artists traditionally considered as members of post-war “lyricism”, starting with Jean Degottex, Georges Mathieu and Gérard Schneider, and including those of contemporary artists such as Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool and Shirley Jaffe, who recently passed away.

One conclusion comes to mind from this historical mapping offered to the public: “Lyricism” goes well beyond Paris in the years 1945-1960. It is also the predominant idea arising from the dialogue between Hans Hartung and those artists, whether they came from the German, French, American, or culture-bridging scenes like Cy Twombly, the American artist shaped by Antic references, who produced a major part of his work in Italy.
The artists displayed alongside Hans Hartung are: Joe Bradley, Jean Degottex, Willem De Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Simon Hantaï, Shirley Jaffe, Georges Mathieu, Albert Oehlen, Sigmar Polke, Gérard Schneider, Gérard Traquandi, Cy Twombly, Charline Von Heyl, Fritz Winter, Christopher Wool, and Yves Zurstrassen.

Fondation Hartung Bergman, Antibes


Additional:

Albert Oehlen

Albert Oehlen and Peppi Bottrop: Line packers” (dual exhibition)
Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles
1 March - June 2018

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1992/2008. Courtesy of the artist
Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 1992/2008. Courtesy of the artist

The Marciano Art Foundation presents Line Packers”, a special exhibition, conceived by Cornelius Tittel, of two German painters Peppi Bottrop (b. 1986, Bottrop) and Albert Oehlen (b. 1954, Krefeld). Beginning March 1, the foundation’s Lounge Gallery will feature Bottrop’s line-drawing paintings responding to the architecture of the Lounge Gallery itself alongside works from Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, a series that the artist began in the early 1990s, which is now regarded as a turning point for contemporary painting.

Bottrop’s work is conceived as a meditation on his hometown, a once prominent coal mining and rail center in the Ruhr region. Bottrop employs charcoal—a metaphor for what once powered the world, and a nod to the now-defunct mechanical industry—in an expansive wall-drawing engraved into slabs of Fermacell, a material now replacing sheetrock or gypsum used in the construction of institutional architecture.

Oehlen’s Computer Paintings, which will be affixed to Bottrop’s walls, made between 1992 and 2008, exemplify Oehlen’s pioneering role as one of the first contemporary painters to explore the nascent capabilities and limits of drawing and line-making through the use of a now-rudimentary Texas Instruments computer. The wall-drawings and supports by Bottrop juxtaposed with Oehlen’s Computer Paintings suggest new possibilities for the line in painting. This line, embedded materially into the Fermacell walls, offers a proposition for the medium of painting to re-define itself. The two autonomous, yet mutually-dependent works establish a place of intensive communication and self-exploration, supporting one another in this single, temporary unification that looks to Wilshire Blvd. and Los Angeles, a city that is just as easily defined by its own lines of interstate and highway infrastructure.

Accompanying this exhibition will be a new text by the arts writer and science fiction novelist, Mark von Schlegell.

Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles


Albert Oehlen

Theft is Vision (group show)
LUMA Westbau, Zurich
18 November 2017 - 4 February 2018

The notion of Theft establishes a site of investigation. This exhibition examines the desire to appropriate – a fundamental theme in the production of art. Throughout art there are typologies that ensue from the appropriation of motifs or of other works of art. As just one form of aggressive theft, the act of citation was already a cultural strategy long before Appropriation Art manifested itself.
At LUMA Westbau the following questions are posed from a contemporary perspective:
What are the genres established through appropriation today? What does stealing mean for artistic production? Is it an act of removal and subtraction? Or can it be a productive strategy as suggested by the art history of Appropriation Art? In the context of this exhibition, Theft is presented as dialogues and translations between artists. In essence, the exhibition confronts two opposing concepts in appropriation: the desire to appropriate as the idolization of sources or as an attack on and subversion of the established.

LUMA Westbau, Zurich


Albert Oehlen

Cows by the Water (solo show)
Palazzo Grassi, Venice
From 8 April 2018

From Sunday 8 April 2018, Palazzo Grassi presents 'Cows by the water', a personal exhibition dedicated to German artist Albert Oehlen (1954, Krefeld, Germany) and curated by Caroline Bougeois.

The exhibition lays out a path dedicated to Albert Oehlen’s production through a selection of approximately 85 works, including some lesser-known ones, created between the 1980s and today. The works brought together come from the Pinault Collection as well as from other major private collections and international museums.

'Cows by the water' path is not chronological but rather suggests a syncopated rhythm between various genres and periods, thereby underlining the central role played by music in the artist’s practice. Music emerges as a real metaphor of his work method, where contamination and rhythm, improvisation and repetition, density and harmony of sounds become pictorial gestures.

Albert Oehlen (1954, Krefeld, Germany) reveals himself to be a major figure of contemporary painting thanks to his artistic research in constant evolution, dedicated to experiments and to overcoming formal limits rather than to the subject represented.

The artist’s work has already be presented in exhibitions around the world, including at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Havana in 2017, the Cleveland Museum of Art in 2016, the New Museum in New York in 2015, the Kunstmuseum in Bonn in 2012 and the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris in 2009. 'Cows by the water' in Venice is his largest monographic one to date.

Palazzo Grassi, Venice


Christopher Wool

Being Modern: MoMA in Paris (group show)
Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris
11 October 2017 - 5 March 2018

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and Fondation Louis Vuitton announce the first comprehensive exhibition in France to present MoMA’s unparalleled collection: "Being Modern: MoMA in Paris", on view at Fondation Louis Vuitton from October 11, 2017, through March 5, 2018.
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Established in 1929, The Museum of Modern Art was one of the first museums devoted exclusively to the visual arts of the time. ''Being Modern: MoMA in Paris’’ represents the wide range of artworks that MoMA has acquired over the decades, ranging from the early defining movements of the modern art period to Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Pop art and digital works of art.

Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris