clear

Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool et al.

Hartung and the lyrical painters
Fonds Hélène & Édouard Leclerc, Landerneau
11 December 2016 - 17 April 2017

In partnership with the Fonds Hélène et Édouard Leclerc pour la Culture of Landerneau (Finistère, France), the Hartung-Bergman Foundation is organizing the exhibition “Hartung and the Lyrical Painters”, curated by Xavier Douroux, director of the art center Le Consortium (Dijon, France), which will run from December 11 to April 17, 2017.

The 60 artworks spanning a period from the 30’s to the 80’s, and including 20 paintings never shown before, were lent by the Foundation in order to create an exhibition that would not solely be dedicated to Hand Hartung, but rather, aims at giving an esthetic, historical, as well as critical overview of what is called “lyricism” by displaying Hartung’s works along with the works of seventeen other artists.
Hartung has long been associated with this term dating from the post-war period. It characterizes a spontaneous and gestural abstraction in which the free expression of a subject, unleashed from its boundaries, dominates. Through this exhibition, an in-depth analysis of Hartung’s “lyricism”, which paradoxically mixes freedom of gesture and controlled construction, will be displayed. To this end, Xavier Douroux has conceived a scenography that intertwines the works of the French-German painter with those of the artists traditionally considered as members of post-war “lyricism”, starting with Jean Degottex, Georges Mathieu and Gérard Schneider, and including those of contemporary artists such as Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool and Shirley Jaffe, who recently passed away.

One conclusion comes to mind from this historical mapping offered to the public: “Lyricism” goes well beyond Paris in the years 1945-1960. It is also the predominant idea arising from the dialogue between Hans Hartung and those artists, whether they came from the German, French, American, or culture-bridging scenes like Cy Twombly, the American artist shaped by Antic references, who produced a major part of his work in Italy.
The artists displayed alongside Hans Hartung are: Joe Bradley, Jean Degottex, Willem De Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Simon Hantaï, Shirley Jaffe, Georges Mathieu, Albert Oehlen, Sigmar Polke, Gérard Schneider, Gérard Traquandi, Cy Twombly, Charline Von Heyl, Fritz Winter, Christopher Wool, and Yves Zurstrassen.

Fondation Hartung Bergman, Antibes


Additional:

Albert Oehlen

Palazzo Grassi, Venice (solo show)
From 8 April 2018


Christopher Wool

Being Modern: MoMA in Paris (group show)
Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris
11 October 2017 - 5 March 2018

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and Fondation Louis Vuitton announce the first comprehensive exhibition in France to present MoMA’s unparalleled collection: "Being Modern: MoMA in Paris", on view at Fondation Louis Vuitton from October 11, 2017, through March 5, 2018.
(...)
Established in 1929, The Museum of Modern Art was one of the first museums devoted exclusively to the visual arts of the time. ''Being Modern: MoMA in Paris’’ represents the wide range of artworks that MoMA has acquired over the decades, ranging from the early defining movements of the modern art period to Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Pop art and digital works of art.

Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris


Christopher Wool

Unpacking: The Marciano Collection (group show)
The Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles
25 May - 24 December 2017

The inaugural exhibition of The Maurice and Paul Marciano Art Foundation draws from the Foundation’s collection of over 1,500 artworks, bringing together an international, multigenerational roster of artists who are among contemporary art’s leading creative and critical voices. With the rise of Los Angeles as one of the twenty-first-century’s global centers for artistic practice, the Marciano Art Foundation has a vision to transform the former Scottish Rite Masonic Temple into a forum dedicated to this thriving community.

Conceived and organized by guest curator Philipp Kaiser, UNPACKING takes its title from German philosopher Walter Benjamin’s 1931 essay, “Unpacking My Library: A Talk about Book Collecting.” Benjamin’s text emphasizes that any order is a balancing act of extreme precariousness. UNPACKING showcases the breadth and depth of the collection while simultaneously creating a loose order where a multitude of meanings collide with a historic site, exposing unpredictable connections. Two underlying thematic threads lead the viewer through the walls of the temple: one focusing on works that emphasize the process of their creation and another to the artists’ archaeological impulses. The abundance of process-based works connects the artists in the collection to an artistic legacy that characterized much of the art of the late 1960s, while the archaeological impetuses point to a prevailing tendency by artists to operate in an investigative mode, mining complex ideas of the artwork’s site and temporality.

The Marciano Art Foundation, Los Angeles