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Glenn Brown

After Life (solo show)
Rembrandt House Museum, Amsterdam
27 January - 23 April 2017

Glenn Brown, Joseph Beuys, 2001, oil on panel, 96 x 79,5 cm, private collection.
Glenn Brown, Joseph Beuys, 2001, oil on panel, 96 x 79,5 cm, private collection.

From 27 January to 23 April 2017 the Rembrandt House Museum presents the work of the contemporary British artist Glenn Brown (1966) in Glenn Brown – Rembrandt: After Life. Brown is internationally renowned for his intriguing and confrontational works, which are usually very large and inspired by the work of Old Masters, Rembrandt among them. Brown appropriates and subverts the work of Rembrandt and his contemporaries with merciless audacity. He is making new work for the exhibition (paintings, drawings and etchings), which will be shown for the first time.

The Rembrandt House has long concentrated on showing Rembrandt’s influence on other artists, but this exhibition breaks new ground. Never before has the Rembrandt House staged an exhibition of work by a foreign artist of Glenn Brown’s international stature. In 1997 Brown’s work hung at Sensation in the Royal Academy of Arts in London alongside such artists as Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin. He is regarded as one of the leading YBAs (Young British Artists). His work enjoys wide recognition and this year was the subject of three solo exhibitions in the United States and France.

Rembrandt House Museum, Amsterdam


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Glenn Brown

True Faith (group show)
Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester
30 June - 3 September 2017

Glenn Brown, Dark Angel, 2002. Courtesy of the artist
Glenn Brown, Dark Angel, 2002. Courtesy of the artist

True Faith explores the ongoing significance and legacy of New Order and Joy Division through the wealth of visual art their music has inspired.

Curated by Matthew Higgs, Director of White Columns, New York and author and film-maker Jon Savage with archivist Johan Kugelberg, True Faith is centred on four decades’ worth of extraordinary contemporary works from artists including Julian Schnabel, Jeremy Deller, Liam Gillick, Mark Leckey, Glenn Brown and Slater Bradley, all directly inspired by the two groups.

Also featuring Peter Saville’s seminal cover designs, plus performance films, music videos, fashion and posters from John Baldessari, Barbara Kruger, Lawrence Weiner, Jonathan Demme, Robert Longo, Raf Simons and Kathryn Bigelow, True Faith provides a unique perspective on these two most iconic and influential Manchester bands. The exhibition will also present a selection of rarely seen personal materials, including original hand written lyrics.

Joy Division was formed in 1976 in Salford by guitarist and keyboardist Bernard Sumner and bass player Peter Hook. Singer Ian Curtis and drummer Stephen Morris completed the line-up. After Curtis’ death in 1980 the remaining members, together with Gillian Gilbert, formed New Order, becoming one of the most influential bands of the decade.

Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester


Glenn Brown

Piaceri Sconosciuti (solo show)
Museo Stefano Bardini, Florence
10 June - 26 October 2017

Glenn Brown, The Shallow End, 2011. Courtesy the artist.
Glenn Brown, The Shallow End, 2011. Courtesy the artist.

The Stefano Bardini Museum is thrilled to announce a major exhibition by Glenn Brown, from 10th June to 26th October. Mining art history and popular culture, Glenn Brown has created an artistic language that transcends time and pictorial conventions. His mannerist impulses stem from a desire to breathe new life into the extremities of historical form. Through reference, appropriation, and investigation, he presents a contemporary reading of images new and remembered.  Borrowed figures and landscapes are subjected to a thoughtful and extended process of development in which they gradually transform into compelling, exuberant entities. In sophisticated compositions that fuse diverse histories—the Renaissance, Impressionism, Surrealism—Brown creates a space where the abstract and the visceral, the rational and irrational, the beautiful and grotesque, churn in a dizzying amalgamation of reference and form.

Glenn Brown Website