Loris Gréaud

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Loris Gréaud is a conceptual artist whose practice develops through long term projects, always engaging in erasing the boundaries we trace between fiction and reality. His works and exhibitions can be seen as the punctual and necessary materializations of his projects and involve all kinds of mediums such as sculpture, painting, installation, video or performance. His approach tends to offer new modalities of appearance for artworks, as well as new ways of exhibiting and distributing art. Loris Gréaud has developed a singular trajectory and gained international recognition since his first solo show Silence Goes More Quickly When Played Backwards curated by Caroline Bourgeois at Le Plateau, Paris in 2005. He was then the first artist to be granted the whole space of the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, in 2008 on the occasion of the first occurence of his project Cellar Door which kept developping through different museums in the world (ICA London, Kunsthalle Sankt Gallen, Museo de la Conservera, Vienna Kunsthalle). He is also the only artist who has exhibited jointly in the Musée du Louvre and in the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris with the internationally acclaimed double exhibition project [I] in 2013. In 2015, he took over the whole gallery space of the Dallas Contemporary museum (United States) with the ambitious project The Unplayed Notes Museum. In 2016, he produced a specific project Sculpt for LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art) in Los Angeles, his first major solo exhibition on the west cost of the United States. The project keeps developing, with for example the screening of an exclusive version of the film at Teatrino di Palazzo Grassi (François Pinault Collection) on the occasion of the 74th Mostra - Venice International Film Festival (Italy) in 2017. He also opened a project in Murano (Italy) The Unplayed Notes Factory, curated by Nicolas Bourriaud, which quickly became a must-see on the occasion of the 57th edition of Biennale di Venezia.

"An artist can act as if nothing was amiss; he or she can keep on producing exhibitions in which objects line up in a closed place, but the whole thing will miss realism. Not the optical realism, which is not our subject, but it will simply miss a contact with reality. That is the true meaning Gustave Courbet gave to realism: "paint from the eye, not from ideas", that is to say getting rid of every ideological preconception and idealistic illusion, in order to show the real in its crudity, with pain and death working together, the stony bottom of the human condition. In short, strip the reality of its stage clothes. From this point of view, Loris Gréaud belongs to the contemporary realist family that already counts Berthold Brecht, Gordon Matta-Clark, Dan Graham, or Mike Kelley. But against what kind of idealism? It has been a long time since artists needed religion or Greek mythology to depict advantageously the behaviour of their contemporaries, thereby ensuring social stability. Contemporary idealism is more insidious: we do not paint the ideal anymore, but we set up the artist as a politically perfect activist, an ideal citizen who has overcome all the prejudices of his or her time — marginal but virtuous. No such positions can be found in Gréaud’s art, yet his work still presents the real of today; not in the form of factual reports, but in a much more direct one, a block of sensations and matter."

Nicolas Bourriaud, The Unplayed Notes (2012-2017): The Forbidden Book, 2018. To be published.

Image: Loris Gréaud, Does an angle between two walls have a happy ending?, 2013, mixed media, 660 x 990 x 230 cm
© Loris Gréaud, Gréaudstudio

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Biography

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